Wine


Wine -

Is not always found in the grocer's stock, but it is in many localities a profitable branch of the trade when it is kept in its proper place. If sold only in bottles or by the quantity, with no sampling, it attracts a good class of customers who use, but do not abuse, the product of the vine and who, for that very reason, prefer to purchase from the grocer.

Selling liquor over the bar should not be mixed with retailing groceries, although in some sections it is very generally done. In the end, it limits the success of the store instead of aiding it. The best custom is driven away, and that which remains too often ends by owing both the bar and the store, the store having trusted a little more liberally on account of the bar, and the bar unable to refuse the credit asked lest the whole bill should be lost - as it frequently is.

The term "WINE" is usually applied only to the fermented juice of the grape, but other fruits, as currants, raspberries, blackberries, gooseberries, elderberries, etc., are employed to make products distinguished generally by the name of the fruit or known as Domestic, or Home-made, wines.

The grapes are, for most types of WINE, picked when just fully ripe, the juice being extracted by crushing and pressing, and stored in open vats for the first or active fermentation. The product is then drawn off the lees and placed in casks for the second or slow fermentation, during which the "character" of the WINE develops. The subsequent processes differ according to the style and character of the WINE desired (see special articles on Champagne, SHERRY, etc.). During development, many wines undergo several "finings" (see CLARIFICATION). The lees, or Argol, deposited is largely utilized in the form of CREAM OF tartar (which see).

The quantity of alcohol in the wines of popular usage generally varies within the following percentages:

alcohol per cent Burgundy (red)................ 8-15 Champagne..................... 12-14 Claret........................ 8-15 Madeira....................... 18-20 Moselle....................... 8-10 alcohol per cent PORT.......................... 18-24 Rhine WINE.................... 8-14 Sauternes..................... 8-15 SHERRY........................ 15-24 TOKAY......................... 9-15

Wines, however, are not consumed for their alcohol alone. They contain other ingredients, derived from the Grape juice, which are more important, both commercially and from the standpoint of the epicure. Their value depends largely on their age, flavor and bouquet.

The matter of age varies with different classes - some reach their prime at four or five years; others will continue to improve after the lapse of several decades. The flavor is attributable to the œnanthic ether formed during the fermentation of the Grape juice - and on its delicacy and other characteristics rests the first popular classification of the merit of a WINE. The bouquet, or blume, which frequently suggests the odors of violets, almonds, etc., is a higher quality peculiar to certain varieties and generally the factor chiefly responsible for giving one WINE a value of five dollars a bottle, while another of the same alcoholic content and general properties, may be listed at only fifty cents. The bouquet is due to obscure volatile oils or to ethers (other than œnanthic) developed by the combination of certain acids in the WINE with the ethyl of the alcohol content - so intangible that they are not detectable by chemical agency, yet very distinct and real to the educated palate.

Among the other substances which lend character are the saline compounds. These, the ashes of vegetable tissues, exist in varying quantity in all fruits, and are found dissolved in their juices, both before and after fermentation. The most abundant is bitartrate of potash, or tartar, but there are numerous others, especially tartrate of lime, tartrate of iron, chloride of sodium, chloride and sulphate of potassium, sulphate of potash and phosphate of alumina, occurring in a total proportion of from one to four parts in one thousand of WINE. Their presence is one of the surest indications of the genuineness of a WINE. Those who manufacture "wines" chiefly from alcohol and water, only incorporating a certain quantity of true WINE for flavor, do not usually add these mineral constituents.

The first great division of wines is by their color. Broadly, the classification is into "Red" and "White," the latter including all wines which have no red in their composition.

The best known of the Red Wines are the Clarets, Burgundies and Ports. Their color is due to the custom of permitting a partial preliminary fermentation of the grapes in their skins - for White WINE, the grapes are pressed as quickly as possible to avoid the skins coloring the juice.

An accompanying attribute of Red WINE is tannic acid, which exists in some types to a considerable extent, and in many varieties, especially those from the south of France and Italy, gives a more or less marked astringency, which is not, though, in any way harmful to the human system. This astringency is usually absent from White Wines, though it is found in some of the darker varieties. Red Wines also generally contain more tartrates and iron, but less acetic ether.

The next divisions are into "Sparkling" and "Still," "Dry" and "Sweet."

Sparkling WINE is that in which remains part of the carbon-dioxide (gas) formed in the fermentation of the Natural sugar of the Grape juice or of the sugar or syrup added thereto. Still WINE is that from which the carbon-dioxide has been permitted to escape.

The difference between "Dry" and "Sweet" wines is due sometimes to the greater quantity of Natural sugar left in the latter during the process of fermentation and sometimes to the addition of small quantities of sweetening afterwards - or to both causes. Clarets contain very little or no sugar; some Sauternes and "sweet" Champagnes show a considerable percentage.

The "body" of a WINE may be due to the unfermented sugar content or, as in rich Rhine wines, to the glycerine contained.

Natural wines to which neither alcohol nor syrup has been added, are very closely akin to the grape, for the process of making is practically nothing but the fermentation of the fruit juice. The difference between Grape juice and Claret, for example, is only the conversion of the "solid matters" and sugar of the grape into alcohol, water and small proportions of glycerine, albuminoids, etc., as will be noted by the average analyses below:

Grape juice Claret sugar.............................................. 21.80 0.13 alcohol............................................ .. 9.82 water.............................................. 76.87 87.61 Glycerine.......................................... .. 0.642 Tannin............................................. traces 0.238 Albuminoid......................................... 0.30 0.278 Total volatile acidity calculated as acetic acid... .. 0.127 Total fixed acidity reckoned as tartaric acid...... .69 0.460 Potassium Tartrate................................. 0.34 0.166 Total mineral matter............................... 0.34 0.220

Fortified Wines, both Dry and Sweet, are those to which alcohol - generally brandy, i.e., grape alcohol - has been added. The best-known examples are PORT, Madeira and the cheaper Sherries. The addition serves two purposes: (1) It gives the WINE greater alcoholic strength than that of any "Natural" WINE, for no matter how heavy the grapes may be in sugar, fermentation is stopped when the alcohol formed by the fermentation of the juice reaches a percentage of about 17% by volume. (2) It makes possible a product containing much of the Natural sweetness of the juice. Grape juice, from fresh fruit, has generally exhausted its sugar in fermentation and is "dry" by the time it has formed a percentage of 9% to 12% alcohol - it seldom reaches the 17% point referred to - but if sufficient alcohol is added when the Natural fermentation has only proceeded, say, half-way, much of the sweetness of the juice is retained in the WINE. This Natural sweetness is in many fortified wines supplemented by the addition of sugar or syrup. By U. S. Standards, all WINE containing more than 16% alcohol is classed as Fortified.

Storing and Care of Wines.

Circumstances vary so greatly that it is difficult to formulate a practical set of rules for the storing and care of wines. It is easy to specify just what conditions should prevail and the proper position and temperature for each kind, but few retailers have the space or facilities for conducting an ideal WINE cellar.

A few cardinal principles must, however, be observed by everyone engaged in selling wines, no matter how limited the department may be, if they are to be turned over without loss and delivered in satisfactory condition.

(1) The cellar is the best place for storing wines, if it is dry, well ventilated and of even temperature, not falling below 50° Fahr., and located where street traffic will not cause undue vibration; but if the cellar is damp or much exposed, an upper floor is safer. No sink or sewer should be in the vicinity of a cellar used for wines.

(2) The temperature should average about 50° Fahr. for a mixed stock. Some wines keep better at a higher temperature, but where it is not practicable to give special attention to each variety, 50° Fahr. is a fair average for all.

(3) Vegetables or strong smelling articles should never be stored near wines. If possible, the cellar, or floor, should be devoted exclusively to WINE storage. Vegetables, growing plants, green wood, etc., are especially dangerous, as they are liable to start fermentation again.

(4) The cellar door should never be left open, as variations are detrimental.

(5) Every barrel should be inspected on receipt - leakage results in atmospheric contact and will spoil the WINE. A cask which has thus lost some of its contents should be immediately refilled to avoid damage. In storing barrels, air-space should be left between each.

(6) Every bottle and its cork should be inspected when received. If the bottles are to be placed in the WINE-bin, their straw envelopes are best removed.

If all other precautions are observed, WINE may be left in cases, but if the WINE-bin is suitably located and arranged, the bottles should be taken from the cases and placed in it.

(7) When binning, the bottles should be placed preferably on racks, lying on their sides so that the WINE covers the corks. Some wines may be stood up, but it is safest to make the rule that all bottled goods shall be kept on their sides. The position is absolutely imperative in the case of sparkling wines, as otherwise the drying of the cork will result in "flatness" from the escape of the carbon-dioxide (gas).

The bottles should also lie with their labels up, so that, when taken out and replaced, they are always returned to the same position with the least possible disturbance of the sediment.

Every bottle should rest on an even foundation and be safe against slipping.

(8) If one side, or end, of the cellar is cooler than the other, the space should be assigned to Champagnes and Rhine and Moselle Wines. The warmest part should be given to SHERRY, Madeira, etc. PORT, Claret, Burgundy and Sauternes come in between.

If there is no difference in temperature, the wines which require warmer atmosphere should be binned or stored on the upper racks.

(9) If the cellar or other store-room is dry, but unavoidably exposed to either heat or cold, it is often advisable to bin the bottles in sawdust. Special care is then necessary, for if the sawdust is damp, it will generate heat and damage the wines, and it is also liable, in some sections, to breed worms, which attack the corks. As a protection against the latter possibility, the top of each bottle may be dipped in wax or rosin.

The Wines Most Generally Consumed.

The general American public does not show the diversified WINE taste of the European. The average demand does not go beyond the various grades of Champagne, Claret, Rhine and Moselle Wines, Burgundy, Sauternes, PORT and SHERRY. To this list may be added, in some parts, a growing taste for Chianti and a limited consumption of TOKAY, Madeira and Muscat. All of these are sold in both imported and domestic varieties.

Consumers should be advised that, when possible, it is best to allow fine clarets and Burgundies - and, in fact, nearly all wines and liquors - to rest a few days after delivery before opening them.

The "Correct" Wines for a Special Dinner.

It is not unusual for the retailer who has established a reputation for his WINE department to be asked by his customer for information as to "the proper thing" in the way of wines for a special dinner or banquet.

No fixed routine of wines can be specified as being the only proper service for a dinner, banquet or other affair, as the highest authorities differ on this point, but the theoretically correct service is that which offers, for each course, WINE which both in flavor and strength "harmonizes" with the dishes of which that course is composed, while at the same time so arranging their sequence as both to lead the palate agreeably rom course to course and to bring out, by contrast and the development of the palate, the full value of each succeeding WINE.

The fashion of the day carries, however, so much weight in all such affairs, that orthodox theories are often brushed aside. A few years ago saw a temporary revolution in WINE service in England and also largely on the Continent and in this country - Champagne was served throughout the entire meal, other wines being entirely disregarded. The "Champagne only" idea is still upheld in some sets, but more general at present is the middle path - that of three or four well-chosen wines.

It must, however, be borne in mind that though the service of Champagne and, say, two other wines, is better on general principles than that of only Champagne, the latter method is more up to date than the former "strictly correct" style of a long list of different wines.

If one offers a full service, the sequence should be about as follows:

COMMENCEMENT.

An apéritif in the form of Punch (though this is unusual in America), a Cocktail, old Madeira, very dry SHERRY or VERMOUTH.

WITH THE oysters.

Light White Wines: Rhine or Moselle - as Hochheimer, Niersteiner, or Zeltinger; or White Bordeaux - as Graves or Sauternes; or White Burgundy - as Chablis.

WITH THE SOUP.

SHERRY, as Dry Amontillado or Manzanilla.

WITH THE fish.

Heavier White Wines, as Johannisberger, Steinberger or Montrachet.

WITH THE ENTRéE AND RELEVé (or "Remove")

Claret, as Pontet Canet, St. Julien or one of the minor Château brands; or Chianti, or Champagne.

WITH THE game.

Burgundy (red), as Pommard, Volnay or Chambertin.

WITH THE DESSERT.

Rich Old Red Wines, as PORT or fine Château Clarets; or rare vintages of White Wines, as Château-Yquem or Schloss Johannisberger; or Champagne; or Italian Wines, as Lacryma Christi; or Spanish Wines, as Malaga - or similar wines of any country.

WITH THE coffee.

liqueurs, as Crème de Menthe, Chartreuse, Bénédictine or Fine Cognac.

Also, throughout the meal, high-class Table Waters.

The choice of the particular brands, etc., must naturally depend on (1) the amount the host wishes to spend and his individual fancy or preference, and (2) the physical construction of the repast.

The simpler "intermediate" style referred to is shown in the two examples below:

The two pages preceding show a number of "correct" glasses for different wines and liqueurs. Here again the choice or decision is largely a matter of individual taste, local custom or temporary vogue. If only the glasses shown are used, no adverse criticism is tenable, but various other styles might be followed and be considered in equally good form.

Decanting, Serving and Temperature.

The American preference is generally for bringing the original bottle of WINE or spirits to the table, filling the glasses from it direct. This is also the correct method from an epicurean standpoint, as, in spite of some assertions to the contrary, the decanting of WINE (emptying the original bottle into a decanter before serving) cannot improve the bouquet or flavor, and very often results in losing a noticeable proportion of both.

Serving WINE from the bottle needs, however, very careful handling in the case of older wines and others having a heavy sediment, as otherwise, in pouring into the glasses, the shaking of the bottle may mix particles of the sediment with the WINE, detracting from the clearness which is so desirable. The wisest policy is to make use of a WINE CRADLE (which see).

Unless served from a WINE Cradle, old still WINE - particularly Claret, Burgundy and PORT - that has been a long time in bottle, should be allowed to stand on end for twenty-four to thirty-six hours so as to permit the sediment to settle to the bottom. If it is then considered advisable or preferable to decant it, a light may be placed behind the neck of the bottle while so doing - you can then see when the sediment has been reached. Before setting it to stand, it is best to partly extract the cork, so that when you are ready to decant, it can be removed with the least possible agitation of the WINE.

An automatic cork puller is almost indispensable for the easy and quiet removal of corks.

The common belief in this country that wines containing sediment are impure, is incorrect. All still wines cast sediment if left in the bottle long enough - a fact well understood in Europe. The same result may follow from weather influences during transportation. This sediment affects neither the flavor nor quality, if the bottles are handled with sufficient care to avoid mixing the contents. The process which results in its absence from sparkling wines of high grade is described in the article on Champagne.

WINE in open bottles should never be left uncorked longer than necessary to serve.

Champagne should be well chilled before serving, but ice should not be put in the glasses.

White Wines, such as Burgundies, Rhine and Moselle Wines and Sauternes, are best at about the temperature of the cellar, 50° to 55° Fahr.; above this, they lose in taste and bouquet. Some people prefer Rhine and Moselle Wines served at a still lower temperature - about 45° Fahr. If too warm, they may be cooled by setting the bottles in iced water - not in ice, as too violent a change of temperature will weaken the bouquet of the finer types.

Red Wines, such as Claret and PORT, are best at a temperature of 60° to 65° Fahr. - about that of a moderately warm room. Burgundy (red) is generally best at 70° Fahr. Below these temperatures they lose in mellowness. As the cellar temperature is generally below 60° Fahr., such wines should be placed where the temperature is a little warmer for some hours before they are needed for consumption.

SHERRY and Madeira should be served at the average temperature for Red Wines, 65° Fahr.

SHERRY and Sweet Wines are especially liable to be chilled during transportation in cold weather and thus to lose their brilliancy. When this occurs, they should be placed for a time in a moderately warm and uniform temperature before putting into the cellar.

Catalog of Wines of All Nations.

The alphabetical list commencing at the foot of this page and concluded on page 704, embraces all wines commercially familiar to the trade in this country and enumerates their chief characteristics. Those distinguished by an asterisk (*) are further described under the headings so marked. Full titles generally include one or more of the terms following:

    FRENCH.

    Rouge. Red. Blanc. "White." Ordinaire. "Common" or cheap grade. Grand vin. WINE of a high class or cru. Premier, première. "First," as of crus or classes. Vierge. First pressing (of the grapes.) Vieux, or Vieille. Old. Doux. Sweet } Sec. "Dry" }See uses in article on Champagne. Brut. Unsweetened } Crémant. Moderately sparkling. Mousseux. Effervescent (as Champagne).

The word Haut is explained in the article on Bordeaux wines (white); Clos is Burgundy; Cru and Château in Claret, and Mas in HERMITAGE.

    GERMAN.

  • Rot. Red.
  • Weiss. "White."
  • Ausbruch. First pressing (of the grapes).
  • Auslese. Selected (grapes).
  • Cabinet. Signifying "very choice."
  • Feinste. Finest. Very delicate.
  • Keller-Abzug. Château-bottling.
  • Essenz. "Essence" (see description in TOKAY).
  • Berg. Mountain.
  • Hof. Manor house.
  • Schloss. Castle.
  • Süss, Süsser. Sweet.
  • Trocken. "Dry."
  • Sekt. Champagne. Sparkling.
  • Perlen. Sparkling.
  • Schaum. Moussieren. Foaming. Effervescent.

    ITALIAN.

  • Rosso. Red.
  • Blanc. White.
  • Dolce. Sweet.
  • Secco. "Dry."
  • Spumante. Sparkling.
  • Amabile. Light and delicate.

Many Italian Wines are classified by French terms, instead of their Italian equivalents.

Where used without any qualification, the word Claret signifies Red Bordeaux WINE (see article on Claret). Note that Château clarets are listed under "Château" instead of alphabetically by the name of the estate.

When used without any qualification, the terms Rhine WINE and Moselle signify white Rhine and Moselle Wines.

The most important articles and items, found in their alphabetical positions, to which the catalog is subsidiary, are the following: American Wines, ANGELICA, Bordeaux, Burgundy, CABERNET, Canary, CATAWBA, CETTE WINES, Champagne, Claret, Delaware, GREEK WINES, HERMITAGE, Hungarian and Austrain Wines, Italian Wines, Madeira, Malmsey, Muscat, PORT, Portuguese Wines, Rhine and Moselle Wines, Riesling, Rivesaltes, SACK, Saumur, SCUPPERNONG, SHERRY, Spanish Wines, Swiss wines, TOKAY, VERMOUTH and ZINFANDEL.

    A

  • Achaier, GREEK.*
  • Adelantadillo. Spanish, Claret-style.
  • Adelsbacher. Moselle.
  • Affenthaler. Red RHINE WINE.*
  • Ahrbleichart. Red RHINE WINE.*
  • Ahrweiler. Red Rhine WINE.
  • Aigle. SWISS.*
  • Ala. Red Austrian (Italian Tyrol).
  • Albanello. Sicilian, rather fiery, deep amber, SHERRY-style.
  • Alcantara. Sicilian, amber, spirituous, frequently pungent.
  • Aleatico. Sweet Italian, dessert type.
  • Aleonzo. White Italian, various styles.
  • Alicante. SPANISH.*
  • Aloxe. Red Burgundy.
  • Altomino. White, dry, from Tuscany, Italy.
  • Ambarés. Claret.
  • Amareno. Sicilian, amber, SHERRY-style.
  • Ambrosia. Greek muscat (Santorin).
  • Amontillado. SHERRY.*
  • ANGELICA.*
  • Arbois. Red Burgundy (Jura district).
  • Arcas. Portuguese, red, slightly sweet and acid.
  • Ardon. Strong red Swiss.
  • Arinto. Portuguese, white.
  • Artimino. Red, Claret-style, from Tuscany, Italy.
  • Arvelets, Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Aschaffenburger. Rhine WINE.
  • AssmannshÄuser. Red RHINE WINE.*
  • Asti. ITALIAN.*
  • Asturia. Spanish, red, dry.
  • Auldana. Australian, white and red, Rhine and Claret styles.
  • Aulère. Red Burgundy.
  • Aulhauser. Rhine WINE.
  • Auvergnat. Orleans Claret.
  • Auxerre. Red Burgundy.
  • Avallon. Red Burgundy.
  • Avelsbacher. Moselle.
  • Ayler Kupp. Moselle.
  • Azambuja. Portuguese, red, full-bodied, tart, spirituous.
  • B

  • Bacchus, Aromatic, gold Santorin (Greek).
  • Bacharach. Rhine WINE - a variety formerly of great repute.
  • Badacsonyer. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Balilio. Red, dry, full-bodied Swiss.
  • Baja. South Italy, white.
  • Bakacsinyer-Bratenwein. White Hungarian.
  • Bakator. White Hungarian (Arad).
  • Baraya. Red Hungarian.
  • Barbera. 1 - ITALIAN.* 2 - U. S., red, Burgundy-style.
  • Bari. Sweet gold Italian muscat.
  • Barolo. ITALIAN.*
  • Barra-a-Barra. Red Portuguese.
  • Barsac. White BORDEAUX.*
  • Batard-Montrachet. White Burgundy (Class II.).
  • Baumes. HERMITAGE.* See also Bommes in BORDEAUX (White).
  • Baumoehl. White Moravian.
  • Beaujolais. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Beaune-grèves. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Beblenheimer. White Reichenweyer (Alsace-Lorraine).
  • Bel Air. Claret.
  • Bellinzona. Red Swiss.
  • Beni Carlo. Red Spanish, Burgundy-style.
  • Bergama. White Austrian (Carniola).
  • Bergerac. Red and white, from Dordogne, France.
  • Berkowitzer. Red and white Bohemian.
  • Berliquet. Claret.
  • Berncasteler. Moselle (see RHINE WINE).
  • Bessar. HERMITAGE.*
  • Beychevelle. Claret.
  • Beziers. Burgundy-style, from Hérault, France.
  • Bigama. Golden Illyrian (Austria).
  • Binger. RHINE WINE.*
  • Blanquefort. 1 - Claret. 2 - White Bordeaux.
  • Blanquette. White, still and sparkling, sweet and dry, from South France.
  • Blaye. Claret.
  • Blume der Nabe. White German, Moselle-type.
  • Blume von Johannisberg. Sparkling Moselle.
  • Bocellas (Bucelias). PORTUGUESE.*
  • Bocksteiner. Moselle.
  • Bodendorfer. Red Rhine WINE.
  • Bodenheimer. RHINE WINE.*
  • Bodenthaler. Rhine WINE.
  • Bommes. White BORDEAUX.*
  • Bonardo. Red dry Italian.
  • Bonnes-Mares. Red Burgundy (Class II).
  • Bordagno. Red dry Italian.
  • Bordeaux Wines. See Claret and BORDEAUX (white)
  • Bosenheimer. White German, Moselle-style, Nahe Valley.
  • Botzen. Numerous varieties from German Tyrol.
  • Boudots. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Boudry. Dry, ruby Swiss.
  • Bourg. Red, from Saumur district. France.
  • Bourgogne. French for BURGUNDY.*
  • Bouzy. Champagne-type from Bouzy, Marne, France.
  • Bracheto, Bracheto Spumante. Red Italian, still and sparkling.
  • Bratelbrunn. White Moravian.
  • Brauneberger. Moselle.
  • Briedeler. Moselle.
  • Brunner. White Austrian.
  • Bual. Madeira.*
  • Bucellas. PORTUGUESE.*
  • Budai. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Bukkaila. Australian, red and white.
  • Burger. U. S., Rhine-style.
  • BURGUNDY.*
  • Buxy. White Burgundy.
  • C

  • CABERNET.*
  • Cailleret. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Cailles. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Calliand. Red Austrian (Italian Tyrol).
  • Calvel. PORTUGUESE.*
  • Camarate. Portuguese, Natural-PORT style.
  • Camerite. GREEK.*
  • Campidano. Red Italian.
  • CANARY.*
  • Cantenac. Claret.
  • Canzemer. Moselle
  • Cape Hock. Cape of Good Hope - SHERRY and Rhine styles.
  • Capo Corso. Dry white Corsican.
  • Capo di Miseno. White, from South Italy.
  • Capri. ITALIAN.*
  • Carbonnieux. White Bordeaux.
  • Carcavellos. Rich, spirituous, Portuguese, white to amber.
  • Carignan. Full-bodied Claret-style (1) from Turin, Italy; (2) U. S.
  • Carlowitzer (Karlowitzer). HUNGARIAN.*
  • Carmignano. Red, dry Italian, from Tuscany.
  • Carwarra. Dry Australian - Burgundy and Sauternes styles.
  • Casalmaggoire. White dry Italian.
  • Caseler. Ruwer (see RHINE WINE).
  • Cassagne. Red Burgundy.
  • Castel Ceriolo. Red dry Italian.
  • Casteldaccia. Italian, red and white.
  • Castelruggero. White dry Italian, from Tuscany.
  • Castel San Stefano. Italian, red and white.
  • Castillon. Claret.
  • CATAWBA.*
  • Cavallaro. Dry, spirituous, amber Sicilian.
  • Cerljenacer. Strong, sweet Dalmatian (Austria).
  • Cerneseker.White Bordeaux.
  • Cérons. White Bordeaux.
  • CEITE WINES.*
  • Chablis. BURGUNDRY.*
  • Chacoli. Light Bisay wines - red and white.
  • Chambertin. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Champagne.*
  • Champans. Red Burgundy.
  • Chantalouette. Red HERMITAGE.
  • Charlemagne-Corton. White Burgundy (Class II.).
  • Charmes. White Burgundy (Class II.).
  • Chassagne. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Château Abel-Laurent. Claret.
  • " d'Arche. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " d'Arsac. Claret.
  • " Astigues Arnaud. Claret.
  • " d'Aux. Claret.
  • " d'Avenson. Claret.
  • " Barreyre. Claret.
  • " Batailley. Claret.*

*SEE SPECIAL ARTICLE.

  • Château Bayle. see Château Guiraud in BORDEAUX (white).
  • " Beaucaillon. Claret.
  • " Beauregard. Claret.
  • " Becker. Claret.*
  • " Bel Air. Claret.
  • " Belgrave. Claret.*
  • " Bellefond-Belcier. Claret.
  • " Bellevue. Claret.
  • " Beychevelle. Claret.*
  • " Boulbene. Claret.
  • " Bouliac. Claret.
  • " Branaire Duluc } Claret.*
  • " Brane Cantenac }
  • " Broustet Nérac } White Bordeaux
  • " Caillou } (second growth).
  • " Calon-Ségur } Claret.*
  • " Camensac }
  • " Camponac. Claret.
  • " Cantemerie } Claret.*
  • " Cantenac Brown }
  • " Carnonnieux. White Bordeaux.
  • " Carnet. Claret.
  • " Chapelle de la Madeleine. Claret.
  • " Cheval-Blanc. Claret.
  • " Citran. Claret.
  • " Clarke. Claret.
  • " Clerc-Milon. Claret.*
  • " Climenz. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " Constance. Claret.
  • " Cos d'Estournel. Claret.*
  • " Cos Labory. Claret.*
  • " Coucy. Claret.
  • " Contenceau. Claret.
  • " Coutet. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " Cremes. Claret.
  • " le Crock. Claret.
  • " Croizet-Bages. Claret.*
  • " Dauzac } Claret.*
  • " Desmirail }
  • " Dillon. 1 - Claret. 2 - White Bordeaux.
  • " Doisy. White Bordeaux (second growth).
  • " Ducasse-Grand-Puy }
  • " Ducru Beaucaillou } Claret.*
  • " Duhart Milon }
  • " Duluc. Claret.
  • " Dupré-Fourcas. Claret.
  • " Durfort Vivent. Claret.*
  • " Ferrière. Claret.*
  • " Filhot. White Bordeaux (second growth).
  • " Flandres. Claret.
  • " Fleurennes. Claret.
  • " Fongravey Bethmann. Claret.
  • " Fourtet. Claret.
  • " Gallan. Claret.
  • " Germanville. Claret.
  • " Giscours. Claret.*
  • " Grand Barail. Claret.
  • " Grand Perrot. Claret.
  • " Grand Puy. Claret.*
  • " Grillet. White Burgundy.
  • " Gruaud Larose Sarget. Claret.*
  • " Guiraud. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " Haut Bages. Claret.*
  • " Haut Barde. Claret.
  • " Haut Breton. Claret.
  • " Haut Brion. Claret.*
  • " Haut-Smith-Lafite. Claret
  • " de l'lle. (1) Claret. (2) White Bordeaux.
  • " d'Issan. Claret.*
  • Château Kirwan } Claret.*
  • " Lafite }
  • " Lafon-Rochet. Claret.
  • " Lafourie. Red Burgundy.
  • " Lagrange }
  • " La Lagune } Claret.*
  • " Lalande }
  • " Lamothe. 1 - White Bordeaux (second growth). 2 - Claret.
  • " Langora. Claret.*
  • " Larose, Guaud-Laros, Gruaud-Larose-Sarget. Claret.*
  • " Larrivaux. Claret.
  • " Lascombes } Claret.*
  • " Latour }
  • " Latour Blanche. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " " Carnet. Claret.*
  • " Laudère. Claret.
  • " Laujac. Claret.
  • " Léoville, Léoville Barton, Léoville Poyferré. Claret.*
  • " Lessar. Claret.
  • " Loubens. White Bordeaux.
  • " Lynch Bages } Claret.*
  • " Lynch Moussas }
  • " Maison Blanche. Claret.
  • " Malescasse. Claret.
  • " Malescot-St. Exupéry. Claret.*
  • " Malle. White Bordeaux (second growth).
  • " Malleret. Claret.
  • " Marbuzet. Claret.
  • " Marguax. Claret.*
  • " Marquis de Terme. Claret.*
  • " Marpau. Claret.
  • " Maucaillou. 1 - Claret. 2 - White Bordeaux.
  • " Mérin d'Or. Claret.
  • " Milon-Déjean. Claret.
  • " du Mirailh. Claret.
  • " Mirat (Myrat). White Bordeaux (second growth).
  • " La Mission. Claret.
  • " Montjoie. White Bordeaux.
  • " Montlys. Claret.
  • " Montot. Claret.
  • " Montrose. Claret.*
  • " Moulerens. Claret.
  • " Mouton d'Armailhacq. Claret.*
  • " Mouton Lafite. Claret.
  • " Mouton Rothschild. Claret.*
  • " Neuf du Pape. Deep colored, heavy bodied, from Rhone district. France.
  • " de Nort. Claret.
  • " Olivier. 1 - Claret. 2 - White Bordeaux.
  • " des Ormes. Claret.
  • " Palmer. Claret.*
  • " Pape Clément. Claret.
  • " Passore. Claret.
  • " Paveil. Claret.
  • " Pavie. Claret.
  • " Pédesclaux. Claret.*
  • " Pessac. Claret.
  • " Peyraguey. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " Peyxotto. White Bordeaux (second growth).
  • " de Pez. Claret.
  • " Phelan-Ségur. Claret.
  • " Pichon Longueville. Claret.*
  • " Pledreux. Claret.
  • " Plessy St. Paul. Claret.

*SEE SPECIAL ARTICLE.

  • Château Poet Ausone. Claret.
  • " Pomys. Claret.
  • " Pontet Canet. Claret.*
  • " Popp-Camensac. Claret.
  • " Poujeaux. Claret.
  • " Poujet. Claret.*
  • " le Prieuré. Claret.*
  • " Rabaud. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " Rauzan (Rausan) Gassies } Claret.*
  • " Rauzan Ségla }
  • " Rieussec. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " Rochet. Claret.*
  • " Romer. White Bordeaux (second growth).
  • " St. Bris. White Bordeaux.
  • " St. Exupéry. Claret.
  • " St. Georges. Claret.
  • " St. Pierre. Claret.*
  • " Salins. White, Alsace-Lorraine.
  • " Sauau. White Bordeaux (second growth).
  • " Suduiraut. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " Talbot. Claret.*
  • " de Tastes. White Bordeaux.
  • " de Tertre. Claret.*
  • " Tivoli. Claret.
  • " Les Trois-Moulins. Claret.
  • " Vieux-Certan. Claret.
  • " Vigneau. White BORDEAUX.*
  • " Ville-George. Claret.
  • " Yquem. White BORDEAUX.*
  • Chebres. White dry Swiss.
  • Chevalier-Montrachet. White Burgundy (Class II.).
  • Chianti. ITALIAN.*
  • Chuscian. Sweet rose-colored, from Rhone District, France.
  • Cividino. White Italian.
  • Clairette. 1 - Numerous white varieties from the Clairette grape, South France. 2 - Sweet U. S., chiefly white.
  • Claret.*
  • Clavoillon. Red Burgundy.
  • Clevener. White German (Baden District).
  • Coberner. Moselle.
  • Cocoules. HERMITAGE.*
  • Colares. Light Portuguese, red and white.
  • Colombier. 1 - HERMITAGE.* 2 - Dry ruby Swiss.
  • Combettes. White Burgundy.
  • Commanderia. Sweet red Cyprus.
  • Como. Greek, brilliant, PORT-style.
  • Completer. White dry Swiss.
  • Conaifesto. Red Portuguese.
  • Concise. Dry ruby Swiss.
  • Concord. U. S. red (Claret) and white.
  • Condrieu. Still white, pale to deep amber, Rhone district, France.
  • Constancia. Liqueur-style WINE from the vicinity of Cape Town, S. Africa. There are three chief varieties - Red, Sweet Pontac (dark and syrupy) and Fonlignac (or "White").
  • Coquembay. White Swiss.
  • Corinth wines. GREEK.*
  • Cortaillod. SWISS.*
  • Corton. Red BURGUNDY* (Class II.).
  • Corveés (Clos des). Red Burgundy.
  • Corvini. Italian, red, dry, rather harsh.
  • Cosné. Red, dry, from Loire Valley, France.
  • Costamser. Red dry Swiss.
  • Costieres. Still, red, from South France.
  • Côte d'Or. BURGUNDY.*
  • Côte Rotie. Still, puplish, aromatic, from Rhone district, France.
  • Côteaux de Marc. Claret.
  • Cras Murge. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Crémant Rose. Rose-colored sparkling Hungarian.
  • Croznovano. White Roumanian.
  • Csomborder. Transylvanian (Austria) Riesling.
  • Cueser. Moselle.
  • Cyprus WINE. Sweet, generally rich and spirituous, topaz to dark, and inclined to liqueur style.
  • Czernoseker. White Bohemian.
  • D

  • Dacareila. Sicilian, amber, sweet.
  • Dame Blanche. White Bordeaux.
  • Dattenberger. Red Rhine WINE.
  • Deidesheimer. Palatinate (see RHINE WINE)
  • DELAWARE.*
  • Deselay. SWISS.*
  • Dhroner. Moselle.
  • Dionnières. HERMITAGE.*
  • Dolcetto. Red Italian.
  • Donski. Russian "Champagne" from the Don Vineyards.
  • Dourc. Natural WINE from the Douro district, Portugal. See PORT.
  • Dürkheimer. Rhine WINE.
  • Dulce. Syrupy, spirituous Spanish.
  • E

  • Ebernburger. White German, from Nahe Valley.
  • Echezeaux. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Edelweiss. Rhine WINE, still and sparkling.
  • Egri. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Eiblingen. Rhine WINE.
  • Eichberger. Sweet white Austrian.
  • Eisenberger. White Hungarian.
  • Eisenthurer. White Austrian.
  • Eltviller Sonnenberg. Rhine WINE.
  • Enkircher. Moselle.
  • Enzerdorfer. White Austrian.
  • Epanner. White Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • Epineul. From lower Burgundy, chiefly red and sparkling.
  • Erbacher. Rhine WINE.
  • Erbametto. Red dry Italian.
  • Erdener. Moselle (see RHINE WINE).
  • Erlauer. Red Hungarian.
  • Ermellecker. White Hungarian.
  • Ermite. Ermitage. HERMITAGE.*
  • Ernster. Moselle.
  • Eschandorfer. Still white German, from Main Valley.
  • Estargel. still, red, from Pyrenées-Orientales, France.
  • Est (Vino dell'). Red Italian.
  • F

  • Falerno. ITALIAN.*
  • Falkensteiner. Red Austrian.
  • Farnese. Sweet oily Greek muscat.
  • Faro. 1 - Red Portuguese. 2 - A light Belgian beer.
  • Faverge. SWISS.*
  • Feilsen. Saar (see RHINE WINE.)
  • Felseneck. Rhine WINE.
  • Ferdistan. Sweet Persian, red and white.
  • Ferrière. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Fèves. Red Burgundy.
  • Fino. SHERRY.*
  • Flandorfer. Red Hungarian.
  • Floirac. 1 - Claret. 2 - Red, sweet, South France.

*SEE SPECIAL ARTICLE.

  • Florence. Red, full bodied Italian.
  • Forli. Red Italian.
  • Forst, Forster. Palatinate (see RHINE WINE).
  • Frainsteiner. White, from German Tyrol.
  • Franconia Wines, See RHINE WINE.
  • Frauenfeld. Red Swiss.
  • Freisa. Red dry Italain.
  • Friauler. Dark Illyrian (Austria).
  • Fronsac. Claret.
  • Frontignac. 1 - Red and white muscat, from South France. 2 - U. S. muscat. 3 - Constancia.
  • Furis d'Ischia. South Italian, white.
  • G

  • Gattinara. Red Italian.
  • Geierslayer Neuberger. Moselle.
  • Gelsenheimer. RHINE WINE.*
  • Genevrières. White Burgundy (Class II.).
  • Geropiga. Sweet Portuguese, liqueur-style, red and white.
  • Gimmeldinger. White German.
  • Glacier. Swiss.*
  • Glenpara. Spirituous Australian, red and white.
  • Gnadlersdorfer. Mild Moravian.
  • Goldeck. White Austrian.
  • Gomera. Red sweet Canary.
  • Gonobitzer. Sweet red Austrian.
  • Goutte d'or. White Burgundy (Class II.).
  • Gouvio. Red, full flavored Portuguese.
  • Graacher. Moselle (see RHINE WINE).
  • Grafenberger. White German.
  • Grafenstein. White German.
  • Gragnano. Red Italian.
  • Grand Puy Lacoste. Claret.
  • Graves. White BORDEAUX.*
  • Greffieux. HERMITAGE.*
  • Grenache. Still, red, sweet, from South France.
  • Grignolino. Dark full Italian
  • Gringet. SWISS.*
  • Grinzinger. White Austrian.
  • Gros-Vimeau. White Bordeaux.
  • Gruaud-Larose. Claret.
  • Grunauer. Sweet white Austrian.
  • Gruneberger. White Prussian.
  • Grünhaüser. Ruwer (Moselle).
  • Guiognières. Red HERMITAGE.
  • Gumpoldskirchner. See HUNGARIAN AND AUSTRIAN.
  • Gunstramdorfer. White Austrian.
  • Guntersblumer. Rhine WINE.
  • Gutedel. German and U. S. white wines from Gutedel grapes.
  • H

  • Hallauer. Red dry Swiss.
  • Hallgartner. Rhine WINE.
  • Haneadan. Sweet Persian, red and white.
  • Hattenheimer. RHINE WINE.*
  • Haugsdorfer. White Austrian.
  • Haut Bommes } WHITE BORDEAUX.*
  • Haut Barsac }
  • Haut Cérons. White Bordeaux.
  • Haut Sauternes. White BORDEAUX.*
  • Heidesheimer. Red Rhine WINE.
  • Heiligengeistwein. Franconia (see RHINE WINE).
  • Hemsberger. White German, Odenwald District.
  • Hérault. See CETTE WINES.
  • Herbemont. U. S., rosy-white, SHERRY-style.
  • HERMITAGE. 1 - See HERMITAGE. 2 - Rich red Australian.
  • Herrenberger. Rhine WINE.
  • Hesslocher. Rhine WINE.
  • Highercomne. Dry Australian, amber and ruby.
  • Hochenburger. Light red Austrian.
  • "Hock," Hochheimer. RHINE WINE.*
  • Hoersteiner. White German, Main Valley.
  • Hoertenberger. Red Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • Homburger. White German, Main Valley.
  • Hubberger. White German, Odenwald District.
  • Hunneweyer. White Rappoltsweiler, Alsace-Lorraine.
  • Hymettus. GREEK.*
  • I

  • Ihringen. White German, Baden district.
  • Imperial Blanco. White light aromatic Spanish.
  • Ingelheimer. Red RHINE WINE.*
  • Irrewang. Red dry Australian.
  • Isera. Red Austrian (Italian Tyrol).
  • Itzsteiner. White German. Moselle-style. Nahe Valley.
  • Ives. U. S., Claret.*
  • J

  • Jarrie. Still, red, from Isère, France.
  • Jassy-Nicorestic. Red Roumanian.
  • Jerez (Xeres). See SHERRY.
  • Jerusalemer. White Austrian.
  • Johannisberger. RHINE WINE.*
  • Jonquières. Still, red, from South France.
  • Josefahofer. Moselle.
  • Jurançon. Aromatic white U. S.
  • K

  • Kaisersberger. 1 - Sweet white Austrian. 2 - Reichenweyer (Alsace-Lorraine), red and white.
  • Kakhetian. Aromatic, red, from the Caucasus.
  • Kalavrita. Greek, liqueur-style.
  • Kalterer. White Austrain (German Tyrol).
  • Kapunda. Red Australian, resembling young PORT.
  • Kariburger. White German, Main Valley.
  • Karlowitzer. HUNGARIAN.*
  • KarthÄuser. Moselle.
  • Kasbin. Sweet Persian, red and white.
  • Kausenberger. White German, Moselle-style, Nahe Valley.
  • Kephista. Dry Greek, red and white.
  • Kiedricher Grafenberg. Rhine WINE.
  • Kientzheim. Reichenweyer (Alsace-Lorraine), red and white.
  • Kinheimer. Rhine WINE.
  • Kirchberger. White German. Baden district.
  • Kissibel. Alsace-Lorraine, white.
  • Klentnitz. White Moravian.
  • Klingelberger. White German, Baden district.
  • Klosterberger. Moselle.
  • Klosterneuberger. White Austrian, liqueur-style.
  • Koenigsbacher. Palatinate (see RHINE WINE).
  • Kokelbürger. Gold Transylvanian (Austria).
  • Kolleser. White Austrian.
  • Kostheimer. Rhine WINE.
  • Kreutzberger. Red Rhine WINE.
  • Krimski. Russian "Champagne" produced in the Crimes.
  • Kuechelberger. White Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • Kütterlé. Alsace-Lorraine, white.
  • Kynousia. Greek, several styles, still and sparkling.
  • L

  • Labin. Bohemian, red and white.
  • LoCôte. SWISS.*

*SEE SPECIAL ARTICLE.

  • La Croix. 1 - Blanc, White Bordeaux. 2 - Rouge, Claret.
  • Lacryma Christi. 1 - ITALIAN.* 2 - Sweet Greek.
  • Lacryma di Castellamare, Lacryma di Tiberii. Italian, similar to Lacryma Christi.
  • Lafite, Lafite Talence. Claret.
  • La Lagune. Claret.
  • Lalande Pomerol. Claret.
  • Lamalonga. Red, rather sweet Portuguese.
  • LaMarque. White Swiss.
  • Lamego. Red Portuguese.
  • Langlade. Red, sweet, from South France.
  • Langres (Clos des). Red Burgundy.
  • Larose. Claret.
  • LaTâche. BURGUNDY.*
  • Latour Martillac. Claret.
  • Laubenheimer. RHINE WINE.*
  • Laudau. Light, sparkling, from Rhone district, France.
  • Lavardio. Red dry Portuguese.
  • Ledenon. Red, sweet, from South France.
  • Leggi (Vino di). A Greek WINE manufactured by Hebrews for the use of co-religionists.
  • Leistenwein. Franconia (see RHINE WINE).
  • Leitacher. Red Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • Léoville, Léoville Barton, etc. Claret.
  • Liebfraumilch. RHINE WINE.*
  • Lieserer. Moselle.
  • Lipari. Red and white muscat from Lipari Islands.
  • Lirac. Very dry, rose-colored, from Rhone district, France.
  • Lissubon. White dry Portuguese.
  • Listrac. Claret.
  • Locarno. Red Swiss.
  • Longueville. Alsace-Lorraine, still white.
  • Lons-le-Saulier. Several varieties, sparkling and still, from the Jura, France.
  • Lorch. Red Rhine WINE.
  • Lormont. Claret.
  • Lugarno. Red Swiss.
  • Luttenberger. See HUNGARIAN AND AUSTRIAN.
  • Lunel. Still white, sweet, from South France.
  • M

  • Macau. Claret.
  • Maccabeo. 1 - RIVESALTES.* 2 - Madeira from the Maccabeo grape.
  • Macon. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Madeira.*
  • Madrina. Deep red, sweet Dalmatian (Austria).
  • Magyaráter. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Mailberger. White Austrian.
  • Maizemino. Red Austrian (Italian Tyrol).
  • Maizières (Clos de). Red Burgundy.
  • Malaga. SPANISH.*
  • Malbec. U. S., Claret-style.
  • MALMSET.*
  • Malvasia, Malvasier, Malvoisie. MALMSEY.*
  • Malvasia, Malvasia Spumante. ITALIAN.*
  • Manzanilla. SHERRY.*
  • Maraschino WINE. See HUNGARIAN AND AUSTRIAN.
  • Marburger. Red and White Austrian.
  • Marcobrunner. RHINE WINE.*
  • Margaux. Claret.*
  • Marignane. Red and white, from Rhone Valley, France.
  • Markgraefler. White German, Baden district.
  • Marsala. ITALIAN.*
  • Masdeu. See Roussillon (this list).
  • Máslás. Light Transyivanian (Austria).
  • Mataro. Claret type - Spanish, U. S. and Australian.
  • Matzner. Red Austrian.
  • Mauerer. Red Austrian.
  • Mauler. Swiss "Champagne."
  • Mavrodaphne. GREEK.*
  • Maximim-Grünhaus. Ruwer (see RHINE WINE).
  • Méal. HERMITAGE.*
  • Médoc. Claret.*
  • Melnicker. Red Bohemian.
  • Méneser. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Mercurey. Red Burgundy.
  • Merkensteiner. Red Austrian.
  • Merzaminos. Dark red Austrian.
  • Meursault, Meursault-Charmes. White BURGUNDY.*
  • Meursault-Santenot. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Mezzolombard. Red Austrian (Italian Tyrol).
  • Minheimer. Moselle.
  • Mittleweyer. White Reichenweyer (Alsace-Lorraine).
  • Mondeuse. Strong red U. S., Burgundy-style.
  • Monnai. Red, from Pyrenées-Orientales, France.
  • Monsao. PORTUGUESE.*
  • Montalcino. Red and white, dry, from Tuscany, Italy.
  • Monteferrand. Claret.
  • Montepulciano. Purple, aromatic, spirituous, from Tuscany, Italy.
  • Monteflascone. Spirituous Italian, white and purple.
  • Montferrat. Light Italian.
  • Monthelhie. Red Burgundy.
  • Montilla. SHERRY.*
  • Montmaillon. French Muscat.
  • Montmatriss. Red tawny Sicilian.
  • Montrachet. White BURGUNDY.*
  • Montu. White Italian.
  • Monzingener. White German, Moselle-style Nahe Valley.
  • Morea. GREEK.*
  • Morgeot (Clos). Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Moscato ("Muscat"), Moscato Spumante, etc. ITALIAN.*
  • Moselbluemchen. Moselle (see RHINE WINE).
  • Moselle. See RHINE WINE.
  • Möttling. White Illyrian (Austria).
  • Moulin à Vent (Close de). Red Burgundy.
  • Moulis. White Bordeaux.
  • Mountain Lagrima. Spanish liqueur WINE.
  • Mouriseo. Red Portuguese.
  • Mouton-Rothschild. Claret.
  • Murets. HERMITAGE.*
  • Muscat, Muscatel, Muscato. MUSCAT.*
  • Musigny. Red Burgundy (Class II.).
  • Mustang. Fortified, red U. S.
  • N

  • Nachenheimer. Rhine WINE.
  • Nasco. Strong Italian.
  • Nauplia. GREEK WINES of numerous styles - red and white Corinth, etc. (see GREEK WINES).
  • Naxos. Pale red sweet Greek.
  • Nebbiolo, Nebbiolo Spumante. ITALIAN.*
  • NECTAR. See NECTAR and GREEK WINES.
  • Neefer. Moselle.
  • Neftenbacher. Red Swiss.
  • Negrara. Red Austrian (Italian Tyrol).
  • Neirano. Red dry Italian.
  • Nerobergr. Rhine WINE.
  • Neszeling. White Hungarian.

*SEE SPECIAL ARTICLE.

  • Nesmélyer. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Neufchatel. Various types of Swiss wines, including "Neufchatel Champagne."
  • Niersteiner. RHINE WINE.*
  • Nippozzono. White, dry, from Tuscany, Italy.
  • Noley. Red Burgundy.
  • Nonnenberger. Rhine WINE.
  • Norheimer. White German, Moselle-style, Nahe Valley.
  • Norton. U. S. Claret.*
  • Noussa. Red dry fruity Greek, from Mt. Olympus.
  • Noyer. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Nuits. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Nussberger, Nussdorger. White Austrian.
  • O

  • Oberemmeler. German WINE, Moselle-style, Saar Valley.
  • Oberfelder Kindermacher. Mild Illyrian (Austrian).
  • Ober-Ingelheimer. Red RHINE WINE.*
  • Oberlander. Red dry Swiss.
  • Oberlinger. Alsace-Lorraine, white.
  • Ockfen. Saar (see RHINE WINE).
  • Odelsberger. Moselle.
  • Odenberger, or Oedenburger. Sweetish white Hungarian.
  • Oeil de Perdrix, or "Pheasant's Eye." Sparkling red Burgundy.
  • Oestricher. 1 - Rhine WINE. 2 - White Austrian.
  • Ofen, Ofner, Adelsberger. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Ohligsberger. Moselle.
  • Ojo de Gallo, or "Cock's Eye." Aromatic, very brilliant, red Spanish.
  • Olewig Neuberger. Moselle.
  • Oloroso. SHERRY.*
  • Opoul. Red, from Pyrénées-Orientales, France.
  • Oppenheimer. RHINE WINE.*
  • Orsan. Dry, red, from Drome, France.
  • Or (clos d'). White Bordeaux.
  • Orvietto, Orvietani. Sweet Italian, red and white.
  • Osterberger. Still white Rappoltsweiler (Alsace-Lorraine).
  • P

  • Pajerete. Gold sweet Spanish.
  • Palatinate Wines. See RHINE WINE.
  • Palma. SHERRY.*
  • Palo Cortado. SHERRY.*
  • Passerretta Spumante. An Italian "Champagne."
  • Passito. Sweet Italian.
  • Passum. Sweet topaz-colored Turkish.
  • Patras. GREEK.*
  • Pauillac. Claret.*
  • Pedro Jiminez. 1 - Tawny Spanish, Malaga-style. 2 - Soft gold Australian.
  • Péléat. HERMITAGE.*
  • Perchtelsdorger. White Austrian.
  • Perrière. Burgundy, red and white.
  • Pesti. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Pettauer. White Austrian.
  • Piantadella. Syrupy red Illyrian (Austria).
  • Picardin. Still, red, dry, spirituous, from Hérault, France.
  • Piccolit. 1 - Sweet Italian. 2 - Thick sweet Illyrian (Austria) "straw WINE."
  • Pickerer. White Austrian.
  • Pierrelle. HERMITAGE.*
  • Piesporter. Moselle (see RHINE WINE).
  • Pineau (blanc, gris, noir). Burgundy-style - the two first white and the third red - from Pineau grapes.
  • Pinuclo (Vino). Deep-tinted white Spanish.
  • PIQUETTE.*
  • Pitoy. Red Burgundy.
  • Ploeschowitz. White Moravian.
  • Poggiosecco. Red, from Tuscany, Italy.
  • Pollau. White Moravian.
  • Pomerol. Claret.
  • Pomino. Chianti-style from Tuscany, Italy.
  • Pommard. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Pommard-Rugiens. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Pontac. See Constancia, this list.
  • Pontet-Canet. Claret.*
  • Porrets. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • PORT.*
  • Posillips. Red Italian.
  • Poutures. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Prannuan-Malvasia. Sweet topaz-colored Turkish.
  • Preaux. Red Burgundy.
  • Preignac. 1 - Claret. 2 - White Bordeaux.
  • Priorato. Red Spanish, resembling fruity PORT.
  • Prosecco. 1 - Italian, red and white. 2 - Reddish-yellow Austrian "straw WINE."
  • Prulièrs. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Puligny. Red Burgundy.
  • R

  • Radisalle. White Austrian.
  • Radkersburger. Sweet white Austrian.
  • Rametzer, Schloss Rametzer. Red and white Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • Rancio. 1 - Red SPANISH.* 2 - RIVESALTES* and similar wines from other parts of South France.
  • Rappoltsweller. Wines of various styles produced in Alsace-Lorraine.
  • Rauenthaler. RHINE WINE.*
  • Rausan. Rauxan. Claret.
  • Rauschenbruch. White Moravian.
  • Raya. SHERRY.*
  • Refoscos. Dark red Austrian.
  • Reichenweyer. Wines of various styles from Alsace-Lorraine.
  • Reiler. Moselle.
  • Reinhardtshausen. Rhine WINE.
  • Revention. Red, from Isère. France.
  • Rheingold. Sparkling white German.
  • RHINE WINE.*
  • Ribolla. White Italian.
  • Richebourg. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Riesling. See Riesling and RHINE WINE.
  • Rimini. Red Italian.
  • Rioja Blanco. Spanish "Sauternes."
  • Rioja Clarete. Spanish "Claret."
  • Rionero. Heavy red Italian.
  • Ripa. Red, dry, from Tuscany, Italy.
  • Risbacher. Rhine WINE.
  • Rittersberger. Sweet white Austrian.
  • RIVESALTES.*
  • Roi (Clos du). Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Romanée St. Vivant. Red Burgundy (Class II.).
  • Roquemaure. Dry, rose-colored. Rhone district.
  • Rosa (Vin doux). Sweet, rose-tinted, from Mt. Lebanon.
  • ROSOLIO.*
  • Rota. See Tinto de Rota, this list.
  • Rothenberger. Rhine WINE.
  • Roucoule. Red HERMITAGE.
  • Roussillon. Fruity, spirituous, deep-colored, dry and sweet, from Pyrénées-Orientales, France.

*SEE SPECIAL ARTICLE.

  • Roveredo. Red Austrian (Italian Tyrol).
  • Rózsamáler. Red Transylvanian (Austria).
  • Ruberberger. Moselle.
  • Rudesheimer. RHINE WINE.*
  • Ruffino. White Italian.
  • Ruppertsberger. Palatinate (see RHINE WINE).
  • Rusivica. Deep red, sweet Dalmatian (Austria).
  • Ruster, or Ruszti. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Ruwersteiner. Moselle-type, Ruwer Valley.
  • Ruy. Red, from Isère, France.
  • S

  • Sabayes. White Spanish.
  • SACK.*
  • Sacra Tent. SPANISH.*
  • Sagunto. Red Spanish.
  • St. André. Claret.
  • " Cancian. White Illyrian (Austria).
  • " Chef. Red, from Isère, France.
  • " Chrystoly. Claret.
  • " Chrystol. } Red, sweet, from Hérault, France.
  • " Drézery. }
  • " Elie. GREEK.*
  • " Emilion. } Claret.*
  • " Estèphe. }
  • " Etienne. Claret.
  • " Genies. Sweet, rose-colored, from Rhone district, France.
  • " Georger. White Hungarian (Pressburg).
  • " Georges. Red, sweet, from Hérault, France.
  • " Georges (Clos). Red Burgundy (Class II.).
  • " Gervais. Claret.
  • " Gilles. Spirituous purple, from South France.
  • " Hippolyte. 1 - Claret. 2 - White Reichenweyer (Alsace-Lorraine).
  • " Julien. Claret.*
  • " Lambert. Claret.
  • " Laurent. Claret.
  • " Laurent des Arabes. Dry, red, from Drome, France.
  • " Loubès. Claret.
  • " Macaire. Claret.
  • " Magdalène. Red Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • " Martin de Mazerat. Claret.
  • " Peray. Dry, white, sparkling and still, from Rhome district, France.
  • " Pierre. Claret.
  • " Prex. Deep red, spirituous Swiss.
  • " Saom. Red, from Isère, France.
  • " Saphorin. White dry Swiss.
  • " Verand. Red, from Isère, France.
  • " Vivien. Claret.
  • Salarem. Red Portuguese.
  • Salces. Red, sweet, from South France.
  • Salurner. Red and white Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • Salvaguin. Deep red, spirituous Swiss.
  • San Michele. Red Austrian (Italain Tyrol).
  • San Sidero. Sicilian, amber, SHERRY-style.
  • Santa Venera. Red soft spirituous Sicilian.
  • Santenay. Red Burgundy.
  • Santenot. Burgundy, red and white.
  • Santo, Santoria. GREEK.*
  • Sartena. Sweet red Corsican.
  • Sassela. Red dry Italian.
  • SAUMUR.*
  • Sausaler. White Austrian.
  • Sauternes. White BORDEAUX.*
  • Sauvignon. Several kinds from Sauvignon grapes.
  • Savigny. Red Burgundy.
  • Scharlachberger. RHINE WINE.*
  • Scharzberger, Scharzhofberger. Saar (see RHINE WINE.)
  • Schottan. White Moravia.
  • Schiersteiner. Rhine WINE.
  • "Schiller" wines. A classof pale light Austrian.
  • Schlossberger. White German, Moselle-style, Nahe Valley.
  • Schmitsberger. Sweet white Austrian.
  • Schonberg Riesling. White Reichenweyer (Alsace-Lorraine).
  • Schrattenthaler. Red Austrian.
  • Schwabenheimer. Rhine WINE.
  • Schwanberger. Light red Austrian.
  • SCUPPERNONG.*
  • Seewein. White Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • Sercial. Madeira.*
  • Sestri Levante. White Italian, from Genoa.
  • Setural. White Portuguese.
  • SHERRY.*
  • Shiebbs. White Austrian.
  • Shiraz. Sweet rich Persian - red, amber and white.
  • Sieblingener. White dry Swiss.
  • Simonthurn. Sweetish red Hungarian.
  • Siracuss. ITALIAN.*
  • Sittersdorfer. Deep red Illyrian (Austria).
  • Sliwowitz. White Hungarian. See also SLIVOVITZ (Liqueur).
  • Solera. See SHERRY. The term is also similarly employed in Madeira.
  • Som, or Sombor. Delicate white Transylvanian. (Austria).
  • Somlauer, or Somloi. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Sommerauer. Moselle.
  • Sonoma (sparkling). U. S. Champagne-style, named after the County of Sonoma, Cal.
  • "SPANISH REDS."
  • Stadtberger. Light red Illyrian (Austria).
  • Steeger. Rhine WINE.
  • Steffensberger. Moselle.
  • Steinberger. 1 - RHINE WINE.* 2 - Austrian.
  • Steinwein. Franconia (see RHINE WINE).
  • Strasser. White Austrian.
  • Straw WINE. The pressings of very ripe grapes which have been dried on reed or straw mats. Syrupy, spirituous and sometimes slightly acidulated.
  • Styrian Wines. Austrian wines from the province of Styria - Luttenberger, Schiller, etc., and "Styrian Champagne."
  • Sultzmelt. Still, white, from Alsace-Lorraine.
  • Sunbury. Delicate red dry Australian.
  • Syracuse. "Siracusa" (ITALIAN).*
  • Syrmier. White Hungarian.
  • Szamorodal. Szamorodnyer. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Szegszarder. HUNGARIAN.*
  • T

  • Tabris. Sweet Persian, red and white.
  • Tarragona PORT. See PORT.
  • Tart (Clos de). Red Burgundy (Class II).
  • Tavannes (Clos). Red Burgundy.
  • Tavel. Very dry, rose-colored, from Rhone district. France.
  • Teher. Sweet Persian, red and white.
  • Temprano. White Australian, SHERRY-style.
  • Teneriffe. CANARY.*
  • Terrasse, La. Red, from Isère. France.
  • Terlauer. White Austrian (German Tyrol).

*SEE SPECIAL ARTICLE.

  • Terma. White, light bodied Portuguese.
  • Termo Tinto. Red Portuguese.
  • Terran. Mild, deep-colored Illyrian (Austria).
  • Terre Forte. Very strong Sicilian.
  • Tetenyer. Slightly sweet, deep red Hungarian.
  • Thaurey. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Thera. Greek, dry-Madeira-style.
  • Thiergaertner. Moselle.
  • Thurgau. Swiss, red and white.
  • Tintara. Tawny strong Australian.
  • Tinto de Rota. Dry red Spanish.
  • Tipo Chianti - Asti, etc. Wines of Chianti, Asti and Kindred style or "type," made in America.
  • Tófalver. Transylvanian (Austria) Riesling.
  • Toggenburger. White Austrian (German Tyrol).
  • TOKAY.*
  • Tonnerre. Burgundy-style, from Yonne, France.
  • Topaz Villa Flor. Aromatic, dry and sweet, Portuguese.
  • Torre Glulia. Italian, red and white.
  • Torres-Vedras. Pale red, sweet Portuguese.
  • Trabener. Moselle (see RHINE WINE).
  • Traminer. White German and Austrian, from Traminer grapes.
  • Trarbacher. Moselle.
  • Trebbiano. Gold syrupy Italian.
  • Trittenheimer. Moselle.
  • Trockenbeer. Rhine WINE.
  • Trogslaver. Red and white Bohemian.
  • Trojer. White Bohemian.
  • Türkheimer. White from Alsace-Lorraine and S. W. Germany.
  • U

  • Uchard. Red, sweet, from South France.
  • Uerziger. Moselle.
  • Ungsteiner. White German.
  • Uvaccia. Syrupy, spirituous Austrian (Istria).
  • Uvaggio. Any Italian WINE from mixed grapes.
  • V

  • Val de penas. Spanish - (1) white, sweet; (2) dry sub-bitter red.
  • Valence, or Valencia. Red sweet Spanish.
  • Valmagra. Red dry Italian.
  • Valpolicello. Red dry Italian.
  • Varognes. HERMITAGE.*
  • Vaucrains. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Vauvert. Red, sweet, from South France.
  • Veltelin. Red Swiss.
  • Verdeilho. 1 - Madeira.* 2 - Australian WINE of Madeira type.
  • VERMOUTH.*
  • Vernaccio. Straw-color Italian.
  • Vesuvio. Italian, red and white.
  • Vigue de Monsteur. Red Roumanian.
  • Villa Salto. Sicilian, amber, SHERRY-style.
  • Villanyi. HUNGARIAN.*
  • Vin, Vini, Vino. Signifies "WINE." For "Vin Rancio," etc., see Rancio, etc.
  • Vino de Pasto. 1 - SHERRY.* 2 - Red Italian.
  • Vino Santo. ITALIAN.*
  • Vinos Tintos. "SPANISH REDS."
  • Vinum Altaris. Sweet red Spanish for altar purposes.
  • Visp. Red dry strong Swiss.
  • Vollradser. Rhine WINE.
  • Volnay. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Volnay-Santenot. Red Burgundy (Class III.).
  • Voslauer. See HUNGARIAN AND AUSTRIAN.
  • Vosné. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Vougeot, Clos de Vougeot. Red BURGUNDY.*
  • Vouvray. White, sparkling from Tours, France.
  • Vugava. Sweet gold Austrian.
  • Vukovárer. Red Hungarian.
  • W

  • Wallershak. White Austrian.
  • Walporzheimer. Red RHINE WINE.*
  • Waltershof. White German.
  • Wawerner. Moselle.
  • Wehlener. Moselle.
  • Weidlinger. White Austrian.
  • Weinberger. White Austrian.
  • Weisskirchen. Hungarian wines, white and red.
  • Werschetzer. Hungarian wines of various styles.
  • Wickerer. Rhine WINE.
  • Wiltengen. Saar (see RHINE WINE).
  • Windischbuchler. White Austrian.
  • Winkeler. Rhine WINE.
  • Winninger. Moselle.
  • X

  • Xeres WINE. SHERRY.*
  • Y

  • Yering. Delicate red dry Australian.
  • Yvorne. SWISS.*
  • Z

  • Zahnacker. White Ruppoltsweiler (Alsace-Lorraine).
  • Zeltinger. Moselle (see RHINE WINE).
  • ZINFANDEL.*
  • Zlatarizza. Rose-color strong Dalmatian (Austria).
  • Zucco. Red Italian.

*SEE SPECIAL ARTICLE.


Arround Wine in The Grocer's Encyclopedia


Windsor, or Brown Windsor, Soaphome
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