Rope


Rope -

A general name for all kinds of cordage formed by twisting together vegetable or animal fibres or metallic wires. That of ordinary commercial use is made of vegetable fibres. The title "rope" is correctly applied only to cordage which is more than an inch in circumference, smaller kinds being preferably designated as lines, cords, twines, etc.

The fibre is obtained from a great variety of plants and "grasses." Among the most important are hemp proper or Cultivated hemp, Manila hemp, Sisal, FLAX, JUTE and Cotton. hemp is used for all sizes of cordage, FLAX only for small lines and cords, and Cotton for thin twine. See FLAX, hemp and JUTE.

In manufacture, the fibres are first twisted together to form a "thread" or "yarn." The yarns are then combined by twisting them into a "strand," and three strands combined in like manner form "rope." All the work in a modern plant is done by machinery, numerous special processes, twists, etc., being required for cordage for special industries and purposes.

The list following gives the approximate weight and strength of cordage of the sizes named:

Diameter(in inches) Weight of 100fathoms*(in pounds) Weight of 100fathoms, tarred(in pounds) Strength ofnew ropes(in pounds) Number offeet in4 pounds(feet)(inches) 6 Thread 1/4 14 17 450 43. 9 " 3/16 20 24 750 33. 12 " 3/8 28 34 900 21. 15 " 7/16 34 41 1,250 17. 18 " 1/2 45 56 1,700 13. CircumferenceIn inches 1 3/4 9/16 61 78 2,500 10. 2 5/8 80 100 3,000 7. 2 1/4 3/4 101 126 3,900 6. 2 1/2 13/16 125 156 4,700 5. 2 3/4 7/8 151 189 5,600 4. 3 1 180 225 6,750 3.4 3 1/4 1 1/16 211 264 7,850 2.9 3 1/2 1 1/8 245 306 9,150 2.4 3 3/4 1 1/4 281 351 10,600 2.1 4 1 5/16 325 400 11,950 1.10 4 1/4 1 3/8 361 451 13,450 1.7 4 1/2 1 1/2 405 506 15,150 1.5 4 3/4 1 9/16 451 564 16,800 1.4 5 1 5/8 500 625 18,700 1.2 5 1/2 1 3/4 605 756 22,600 1. 6 2 720 900 26,900 .10 6 1/2 2 1/4 845 1,056 31,500 .8 1/2 7 2 3/8 885 1,125 1,406 42,000 .6 1/4 7 1/2 2 1/2 1,125 1,406 42,000 .6 1/4 8 2 5/8 1,280 1,600 47,800 .5 1/2 8 1/2 2 7/8 1,445 1,806 54,000 .5 9 3 1,620 2,025 60,500 .4 1/2

*A fathom equals six feet.

Although of an antiquity reaching back toward the earliest ages of man - the art of twisting animal hair, tough grass and vegetable fibres having apparently existed among the rudest people - it is only within the last two centuries that rope-making has received the successful attention of mechanical inventors. The primitive wheel, the workman with a bundle of hemp strung around his waist and the slow, laborious operation of laying and twisting the strands by manual labor may still be seen in remote places.


Arround Rope in The Grocer's Encyclopedia


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